Policy matters in election 2022

What are the issues that should matter for Australians?

What are the essential choices we need to make as a country?

Australians will cast their vote on 21 May.

A wide range of polls have been conducted on the issues that matter to Australians, including those published by the ABC’s Vote Compass, the AFR, and private research companies. The themes consistently rated at the top of these surveys are the economy, climate change, healthcare, government integrity and accountability.

Researchers and experts from the University of Sydney Business School and Sydney Policy Lab have come together to take you through what we think should be top of mind when it comes to policy during this election campaign. 

Drawing on their research and expertise, members of the Lab team and Business School colleagues give their take on issues including climate change, the economy, health, COVID recovery and even the future of democracy itself.

Beyond the political theatre of the campaign trail, what are the issues that should matter for Australians in this 2022 federal election? From the economy, health and climate change to COVID recovery and the future of democracy – the Sydney Policy Lab and University of Sydney Business School give their take on why policy matters.

Policy Matters

The economy

Election contests always involve a battle over economic management. Professor Tim Soutphommasane, Professor Clinton Free and Claire Connelly explore the lived experience of the economy, and the kind of vision needed to build our future prosperity.

Healthcare

COVID has put health front of mind for all of us. Now we are faced with an ageing population, a stretched public hospital system and the threat of future pandemics. Professor Tim Soutphommasane, Associate Professor Helena Nguyen and Professor John Buchanan outline the changes needed to build a stronger healthcare system.

Climate change

Australia is already seeing the effects of climate change. Professor Tim Soutphommasane, Associate Professor Amanda Tattersall and Dr Tanya Fiedler explore the urgent need to address climate risk and transition to clean renewable energy.

COVID recovery and the future of democracy

What does post-pandemic recovery look like for Australia? How can we rejuvenate our democracy? Professor Tim Soutphommasane, Nick Bryant and Professor Clinton Free explore some big questions about Australia’s post-COVID future.

Tim Soutphommasane

Professor Tim Soutphommasane

Acting Director
Political theorist and human rights advocate
Sydney Policy Lab

Clinton Free

Professor Clinton Free

Deputy Dean and Head of School
Corporate governance expert
University of Sydney Business School

Dr Tanya Fiedler

Climate risk expert
University of Sydney Business School

Amanda Tattersall

A/Professor Amanda Tattersall

Climate transition researcher
Sydney Policy Lab

Claire Connelly

Economics and data specialist
Sydney Policy Lab

A/Professor Helena Nguyen

Business health and wellbeing expert
University of Sydney Business School

John Buchanan

Professor John Buchanan

Health and work researcher
University of Sydney Business School

Nick Bryant

Author on democracy and global politics
Sydney Policy Lab

Policy Matters is a collaboration between the University of Sydney Business School and the Sydney Policy Lab. Learn more about the collaboration.

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